There is an important story about women, peace and security that needs to be told.
We are putting the spotlight on women who have paved the way – the bold and the brave – and we know there are and can be many more of them.
We are pushing for #MoreWomenMorePeace

Last year, more countries were experiencing violent conflict than in nearly 30 years. In many cases we didn’t fail to see the conflicts coming – we failed to respond in time. It is time to step up. We must act before wars are waged and massacres committed. We must invest in peace.

Minister for Foreign Affairs Margot Wallström has been awarded a prize by the UN body UN Women in New York. She received the Agent of Change Award for her commitment to gender equality and her work to strengthen women’s rights.

There is an important story about women, peace and security that needs to be told. We are putting the spotlight on women who have paved the way – the bold and the brave – and we know there are and can be many more of them. We are pushing for #MoreWomenMorePeace.

The Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Swedish efforts to provide innovative solutions in humanitarian emergencies.  One of many examples are the solar panels at Azraq refugee camp in Jordan.

During the first six months on the UN Security Council, the Permanent Mission of Sweden to the UN in New York has worked closely with the Permanent Representation of Sweden to the EU in Brussels and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in Stockholm on many important issues. The synergy effects are clear: membership of the Security Council has helped strengthen Sweden’s participation in the EU. 

Today, 8 June, is World Oceans Day, and marine issues have never been higher on the agenda. Tomorrow marks the end of the UN Ocean Conference, where many countries and stakeholders have gathered to reverse the cycle of ocean decline.

The ocean is in a critical condition. Overfishing, litter and acidification threaten both the ocean and human life. Human activity is responsible for this state of affairs; it must also be human activity that turns this around.

Sweden has historically been one of the most generous donors to the World Bank’s fund for the poorest, IDA. Now, as drought and subsequent famine looms over a number of countries, the IDA rushes to support the frontlines.