Recently, Director-General of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Robert Azevêdo and Sweden’s Minister for EU Affairs and Trade Ann Linde met in Stockholm for talks on the challenges facing global trade in these times of protectionist currents.

Globalisation has reduced poverty in the world – but it has also increased inequality. Consequently, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is now strengthening its efforts to ensure fairer globalisation.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives in Stockholm in Tuesday for talks with Prime Minister Stefan Löfven and to take part in some inspiring seminars on future innovative solutions.

The problem is that there are actually not that many fish left in the sea. Now I’m talking about real fish, not partners. Since 1970 we have experienced a decline in marine species populations by 49%. 29% of all fish stocks are overfished and 61% are fully fished. Some estimates show that in 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in our seas.

The ambition was to conclude the EGA this weekend. We failed. A lot of finger pointing is taking place right now, as usual after negotiations stall, but trying to assign blame is not really meaningful. In trade negotiations defensive interests are usually the most difficult obstacles to get past. Even in an agreement like the EGA where the gains for all are so obvious, we could not avoid getting stuck on a few defensive positions.

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and continuing to fight for today!

Sweden’s economy, industry and start-ups are currently experiencing impressive growth. With top innovative clusters, Sweden has become a world leader in innovation. These factors attract international business to Sweden. Even so, the Swedish Government is stepping up its efforts to make the country more attractive for global investments.

Det går bra för svensk ekonomi, industri och svenska start-ups. Vi är världsledande inom innovation och har kompetenskluster i världsklass. Detta lockar internationella företag till Sverige. Samtidigt kan vi göra mer för att bidra till att utländska företag ska vilja investera i Sverige.

Sverige är ett av världens mest kreativa länder och rankat till nummer sju i the Global Creativity Index 2015. Kreativitet och innovation är mer ofta synonymt med landet och inom den kreativa och kulturella sektorn har hela 45 procent av företagen sålt förbättrade eller nya tjänster under de senaste tre åren, och nästan var tredje kreativt och kulturellt företag exporterar. Dessa näringar bidrar således till nya innovativa tjänster och lösningar för framtiden och blir allt mer viktiga för svensk ekonomisk tillväxt. Men inte minst spelar dessa näringar en särskilt viktig roll för bilden av Sverige.