Meet the Global Swedes: Miranda Restorick, Canada, student at the Stockholm School of Economics.

The Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Swedish efforts to provide innovative solutions in humanitarian emergencies.  One of many examples are the solar panels at Azraq refugee camp in Jordan.

Free trade, the Global Deal and the economic potential of gender equality. These were among the topics Sweden raised during this year’s OECD Week in Paris, where the theme was how globalisation can better benefit everyone.

Another successful Swedish invention. Another side of the fight to #SaveOurOcean.

Sweden has again been highlighted as a pioneer for sustainability. Sweden’s tax reductions for repairs is a finalist for the INDEX: Award, one of the world’s largest design competitions which rewards design that promotes sustainability.

The amount of plastic that ends up in our oceans is increasing exponentially. Adventurer and diver Oskar Kihlborg is one of the activists trying to help reverse the trend.

The new wastewater treatment plant in Kaliningrad, which was co-financed by Sweden, represents an important step towards improving water quality in the Baltic Sea. This is because the wastewater from Kaliningrad’s close to half a million inhabitants has for many years run straight out into the Baltic Sea untreated.

Today, 8 June, is World Oceans Day, and marine issues have never been higher on the agenda. Tomorrow marks the end of the UN Ocean Conference, where many countries and stakeholders have gathered to reverse the cycle of ocean decline.

The ocean is in a critical condition. Overfishing, litter and acidification threaten both the ocean and human life. Human activity is responsible for this state of affairs; it must also be human activity that turns this around.

We cannot protect our share of the ocean with walls; instead, we must cooperate in a spirit of solidarity.