There is an important story about women, peace and security that needs to be told.
We are putting the spotlight on women who have paved the way – the bold and the brave – and we know there are and can be many more of them.
We are pushing for #MoreWomenMorePeace

Sweden is to become one of the world’s first fossil-free welfare nations, and the Government is now implementing the largest initiatives on climate and the environment in modern times.

Sweden will continue do its utmost to unite the world around concrete actions to save our oceans and meet our voluntary commitments. On 12–13 October, Sweden and Monaco will move from words to action through the conference ‘Connecting and Protecting Our Seas: Initiatives in the Baltic and the Mediterranean’, which was also registered as a voluntary commitment during the UN Ocean Conference.

Meet the Global Swedes: Miranda Restorick, Canada, student at the Stockholm School of Economics.

The Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Swedish efforts to provide innovative solutions in humanitarian emergencies.  One of many examples are the solar panels at Azraq refugee camp in Jordan.

Free trade, the Global Deal and the economic potential of gender equality. These were among the topics Sweden raised during this year’s OECD Week in Paris, where the theme was how globalisation can better benefit everyone.

Another successful Swedish invention. Another side of the fight to #SaveOurOcean.

Sweden has again been highlighted as a pioneer for sustainability. Sweden’s tax reductions for repairs is a finalist for the INDEX: Award, one of the world’s largest design competitions which rewards design that promotes sustainability.

The amount of plastic that ends up in our oceans is increasing exponentially. Adventurer and diver Oskar Kihlborg is one of the activists trying to help reverse the trend.

The new wastewater treatment plant in Kaliningrad, which was co-financed by Sweden, represents an important step towards improving water quality in the Baltic Sea. This is because the wastewater from Kaliningrad’s close to half a million inhabitants has for many years run straight out into the Baltic Sea untreated.