Globalisation has reduced poverty in the world – but it has also increased inequality. Consequently, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is now strengthening its efforts to ensure fairer globalisation.

Never have our oceans been as stressed as they are today. And yet, the world has long chosen not to recognise or acknowledge the seriousness of the situation, or perhaps it has seen the problems as isolated issues. This is why the UN Ocean Conference in June is so important.

The problem is that there are actually not that many fish left in the sea. Now I’m talking about real fish, not partners. Since 1970 we have experienced a decline in marine species populations by 49%. 29% of all fish stocks are overfished and 61% are fully fished. Some estimates show that in 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in our seas.

Given the profound impact of climate change, it is increasingly being viewed as a source of security risks. What are these exactly and what instruments are there for policy to address those risks?

The ambition was to conclude the EGA this weekend. We failed. A lot of finger pointing is taking place right now, as usual after negotiations stall, but trying to assign blame is not really meaningful. In trade negotiations defensive interests are usually the most difficult obstacles to get past. Even in an agreement like the EGA where the gains for all are so obvious, we could not avoid getting stuck on a few defensive positions.

This summer, former Director-General of the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, was appointed new Chair of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). This autumn she took up her new full-time position at the Secretariat in Paris.

One year after the historic climate agreement at COP21 in Paris, it’s time again. On this occasion, the countries of the world are meeting in Marrakech for the major climate change conference COP22. The main objective is to establish a regulatory framework to enable countries to reach the goals agreed in Paris.

Sweden, Fiji and small island developing states to make sure Sustainable Development Goal 14 gets off to a flying start

A high-level debate on the implementation of the Global Goals of the 2030 Agenda will take place in New York on 21 April at the invitation of the President of the United Nations General Assembly. Sweden will be represented in New York by Minister for Climate and the Environment and Deputy Prime Minister Åsa Romson. The following day, Ms Romson will attend a signing ceremony for the climate agreement that was adopted in Paris, convened by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki moon.