It took the Iraqi army three years to break Daesh/ISIL’s territorial hold of Iraq, which at one point amounted to a third of the country. The war against Daesh/ISIL resulted in large-scale destruction and humanitarian needs on a massive scale. At its peak, over 5 million Iraqis fled their homes and just under half are still waiting to go back.
Many of the major cities formerly held by Daesh/ISIL were completely destroyed as a result of the conflict. One example is Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, renowned for its rich cultural and historical heritage. Following the liberation of the city in July 2017, the focus is now on rebuilding basic infrastructure so that internally displaced persons can go back to their homes and resume some form of normality. However, the challenges of doing so are turning out to be a lot greater than anyone had expected. The Embassy visited Mosul to observe the work of the UN in the area and to see the challenges of stabilisation in the aftermath of war.

There is an important story about women, peace and security that needs to be told.
We are putting the spotlight on women who have paved the way – the bold and the brave – and we know there are and can be many more of them.
We are pushing for #MoreWomenMorePeace

Swedish companies in Colombia and Sweden’s Embassy in Bogota have joined forces to support families affected by the landslide in Mocoa in April. The disaster caused over 320 fatalities and considerable material damage. After being contacted by several Swedish companies wondering how they could help, the Embassy decided to coordinate a donation of the Swedish water treatment innovation, Solvatten.

The number of refugees in the world has hit an all-time high. According to the UNHCR there are now 65.6 million forcibly displaced people. This includes over 40 million internally displaced people, 3 million asylum seekers and 22.5 million refugees of which 5.3 million are Palestinian refugees registered with UNRWA.

Sverige har historiskt sett varit en av de mest generösa bidragsgivarna till Världsbankens fond för de fattigaste, Internationella utvecklingsfonden (IDA). När torka och påföljande hungersnöd nu hotar ett flertal länder, söker sig IDA snabbt till drabbade områden för att erbjuda stöd.

Sweden has historically been one of the most generous donors to the World Bank’s fund for the poorest, IDA. Now, as drought and subsequent famine looms over a number of countries, the IDA rushes to support the frontlines.