Sweden is to become one of the world’s first fossil-free welfare nations, and the Government is now implementing the largest initiatives on climate and the environment in modern times.

Sweden will continue do its utmost to unite the world around concrete actions to save our oceans and meet our voluntary commitments. On 12–13 October, Sweden and Monaco will move from words to action through the conference ‘Connecting and Protecting Our Seas: Initiatives in the Baltic and the Mediterranean’, which was also registered as a voluntary commitment during the UN Ocean Conference.

The Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Swedish efforts to provide innovative solutions in humanitarian emergencies.  One of many examples are the solar panels at Azraq refugee camp in Jordan.

Free trade, the Global Deal and the economic potential of gender equality. These were among the topics Sweden raised during this year’s OECD Week in Paris, where the theme was how globalisation can better benefit everyone.

In June, the Swedish Government published its report on Sweden’s progress in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. The report, which will be presented to the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in July for voluntary national review, shows that Sweden is on the right track – but is also still facing major challenges.

Sweden has again been highlighted as a pioneer for sustainability. Sweden’s tax reductions for repairs is a finalist for the INDEX: Award, one of the world’s largest design competitions which rewards design that promotes sustainability.

Today, 8 June, is World Oceans Day, and marine issues have never been higher on the agenda. Tomorrow marks the end of the UN Ocean Conference, where many countries and stakeholders have gathered to reverse the cycle of ocean decline.

We cannot protect our share of the ocean with walls; instead, we must cooperate in a spirit of solidarity.

With everything from plastic dresses to ‘watchdogs’, Team Sweden put the spotlight on the 2030 Agenda in the Czech Republic in April, and how we can work together for sustainable development. Government representatives, companies, civil society and many committed people contributed to discussions, which will now continue.

Ahead of the Forum on Financing for Development in New York on 22–25 May, the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MFA) has released a report containing more than 200 concrete examples of how to achieve the Global Goals. The aim of the report is to stimulate dialogue with other countries and actors and help inspire concrete ideas: “This is very much an educational product to raise awareness of the importance of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda and its link to the 2030 Agenda,” says Måns Fellesson, Deputy Director at the MFA Global Agenda Department.