As this year’s UN Climate Change Conference (COP 23) is about to begin in Bonn, the good news is that the international community remains strongly committed to moving ahead with the Paris Agreement on climate action. Some 165 countries plus the European Union have already pledged, through their ratifications of this landmark agreement, to achieve the goal of keeping the global temperature rise below two degrees Celsius.

There is an important story about women, peace and security that needs to be told.
We are putting the spotlight on women who have paved the way – the bold and the brave – and we know there are and can be many more of them.
We are pushing for #MoreWomenMorePeace.

Sweden is to become one of the world’s first fossil-free welfare nations, and the Government is now implementing the largest initiatives on climate and the environment in modern times.

Sweden will continue do its utmost to unite the world around concrete actions to save our oceans and meet our voluntary commitments. On 12–13 October, Sweden and Monaco will move from words to action through the conference ‘Connecting and Protecting Our Seas: Initiatives in the Baltic and the Mediterranean’, which was also registered as a voluntary commitment during the UN Ocean Conference.

The Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Swedish efforts to provide innovative solutions in humanitarian emergencies.  One of many examples are the solar panels at Azraq refugee camp in Jordan.

In June, the Swedish Government published its report on Sweden’s progress in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. The report, which will be presented to the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in July for voluntary national review, shows that Sweden is on the right track – but is also still facing major challenges.

Sweden has again been highlighted as a pioneer for sustainability. Sweden’s tax reductions for repairs is a finalist for the INDEX: Award, one of the world’s largest design competitions which rewards design that promotes sustainability.

The amount of plastic that ends up in our oceans is increasing exponentially. Adventurer and diver Oskar Kihlborg is one of the activists trying to help reverse the trend.

Resistance to women’s, girls’ and young people’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights has increased, write Margot Wallström, Minister for Foreign Affairs, and Isabella Lövin, Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate.

Today, 8 June, is World Oceans Day, and marine issues have never been higher on the agenda. Tomorrow marks the end of the UN Ocean Conference, where many countries and stakeholders have gathered to reverse the cycle of ocean decline.