For Sweden, the fight for human rights – both at home and internationally – is a key issue that must permeate all policy areas.
Human Rights Day is celebrated around the world on 10 December every year.
Rarely has the day been as important to celebrate as now.

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act. It was the first legislation of its kind anywhere in the world.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and are still worth fighting for today!

The statue of Swedish newspaper publisher Lars Johan Hierta watches over Riddarhustorget in Stockholm’s Old Town. And what a proud inscription: “Lars Johan Hierta, pioneer of a free press and popular government.”

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and continuing to fight for today!

The difficult situation for journalists and media workers in Afghanistan was the focus when the Embassy of Sweden and the EU Delegation hosted a conference on journalist security and freedom of expression in Kabul. The conference honored all journalists that have become victims of violence in the country. In his introductory remarks, Sweden’s Ambassador Anders Sjöberg paid tribute to Swedish Radio journalist Nils Horner who was murdered in Kabul two years ago.