Meat the Global Swedes: Adina Khamitova from Kazakhstan is one of the students presented with the Global Swede award.

17 May is the international day against homophobia, transphobia and biphobia (IDAHOT) – an important day aimed at highlighting the hate, violence and discrimination that still persist against LGBTI persons around the world.

At Sweden’s initiative, Johan Bävman’s photo exhibition Swedish Dads was on display at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris for several weeks in March and April. The exhibition shows 25 fathers on parental leave, and offers a snapshot of Swedish dads’ views on parental leave and gender equality. Some 10 000–15 000 people saw the exhibition at the OECD.

Wikipedia is the world’s most used online encyclopaedia. Among the millions of articles there are four times as many articles about men as there are about women. Behind the scenes the figures are even worse: only nine per cent of editors are women and one per cent are transgender people; the rest are men. Moreover, the majority of those who edit articles are well-educated people from countries in the west.
But this can be changed. Sweden’s Embassy in New Delhi decided to help out.

Representatives of some 50 nations gathered in Brussels at the beginning of March to build a global financial and political partnership for the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of women and girls. The She Decides conference reverberated across the world and was able to raise a total of EUR 181 million to support organisations working on SRHR.

In March and April, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania, Palestine and Bangladesh will publish current gender statistics. This is the result of a Swedish development aid venture, in which Statistics Sweden has trained and provided support to statisticians and users of statistics during one year.

De senaste åren har kvinnorna i Utrikesförvaltningen blivit allt fler. Trenden är särskilt tydlig på chefsposter.

Gender-based violence has enormous consequences, for victims, relatives and friends, and the whole of society. Sweden’s work against gender-based violence is conducted at many levels and with a range of different tools, both nationally and internationally.

How can migrant women lead in their communities and contribute to their new societies? This was the central theme when representatives from business, the NGO community and government gathered at the Swedish Institute to take part in a round-table discussion.

When Alva Myrdal was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1982, she had been fighting a tough battle for decades as one of the strongest advocates of disarmament. For many years, she led the Swedish delegation in the disarmament negotiations in Geneva and was the first woman to reach leading positions in the United Nations.

So Alva Myrdal could well be seen as an early incarnation of the feminist foreign policy that Sweden pursues today.