The best gift we can give each other is to make the world a better place. Our Global Goals Calendar has featured some examples of what Sweden is doing to help achieve the Global Goals for Sustainable Development and live up to the 2030 Agenda – both at home and abroad.

Earlier this year, Somalia was facing the sort of serious famine it experienced in 2011. The situation is still difficult, but thanks to rapid action from the international community, a major disaster has been averted.

For more than 20 years, children and university students in Malmö have connected with each other through the Nightingale mentoring programme. It is about making higher education a realistic ambition for children who may not receive such encouragement at home, increasing integration and building bridges between different worlds.

Last year the Embassy of Sweden in Moscow, together with Swedish companies operating in Russia, initiated a sustainability network to raise the profile of sustainability and environmental issues in the business sector. The network meets regularly and engages both Swedish and Russian companies.

Sweden will continue do its utmost to unite the world around concrete actions to save our oceans and meet our voluntary commitments. On 12–13 October, Sweden and Monaco will move from words to action through the conference ‘Connecting and Protecting Our Seas: Initiatives in the Baltic and the Mediterranean’, which was also registered as a voluntary commitment during the UN Ocean Conference.

The Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Swedish efforts to provide innovative solutions in humanitarian emergencies.  One of many examples are the solar panels at Azraq refugee camp in Jordan.

In June, the Swedish Government published its report on Sweden’s progress in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. The report, which will be presented to the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in July for voluntary national review, shows that Sweden is on the right track – but is also still facing major challenges.

The amount of plastic that ends up in our oceans is increasing exponentially. Adventurer and diver Oskar Kihlborg is one of the activists trying to help reverse the trend.

Today, 8 June, is World Oceans Day, and marine issues have never been higher on the agenda. Tomorrow marks the end of the UN Ocean Conference, where many countries and stakeholders have gathered to reverse the cycle of ocean decline.

With everything from plastic dresses to ‘watchdogs’, Team Sweden put the spotlight on the 2030 Agenda in the Czech Republic in April, and how we can work together for sustainable development. Government representatives, companies, civil society and many committed people contributed to discussions, which will now continue.