For Sweden, the fight for human rights – both at home and internationally – is a key issue that must permeate all policy areas.
Human Rights Day is celebrated around the world on 10 December every year.
Rarely has the day been as important to celebrate as now.

It’s time to celebrate the great minds of science in the spirit of Alfred Nobel. Saturday 10 December is the day of the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall and the dazzling Nobel Banquet at the Stockholm City Hall.

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act. It was the first legislation of its kind anywhere in the world.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and are still worth fighting for today!

The statue of Swedish newspaper publisher Lars Johan Hierta watches over Riddarhustorget in Stockholm’s Old Town. And what a proud inscription: “Lars Johan Hierta, pioneer of a free press and popular government.”

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and continuing to fight for today!

One year after the historic climate agreement at COP21 in Paris, it’s time again. On this occasion, the countries of the world are meeting in Marrakech for the major climate change conference COP22. The main objective is to establish a regulatory framework to enable countries to reach the goals agreed in Paris.

Hans Blix’ career path was shaped during the Second World War: he wanted to head out into the world and work for peace. This drive led him to several leading international positions and a mission as one of the leading forces working for safer nuclear energy and against weapons of mass destruction.

When Alva Myrdal was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1982, she had been fighting a tough battle for decades as one of the strongest advocates of disarmament. For many years, she led the Swedish delegation in the disarmament negotiations in Geneva and was the first woman to reach leading positions in the United Nations.

So Alva Myrdal could well be seen as an early incarnation of the feminist foreign policy that Sweden pursues today.

The United Nations, headed by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, has chosen Crown Princess Victoria to be one of sixteen Advocates to promote the Sustainable Development Goals, also known as the Global Goals. The role the Crown Princess and the other Advocates will play will be to “leverage their unique standing and leadership” to promote the messages and encourage partnerships with governments, the private sector and civil society.

It is often said of Olof Palme that he made Sweden larger.

This may be true, but it was hardly his objective. Olof Palme was an outspoken fighter for the rights and freedoms of people all over the world – a tradition that Swedish foreign policy still rests on today. This is how peace and security have to be built.