Ahead of the Forum on Financing for Development in New York on 22–25 May, the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MFA) has released a report containing more than 200 concrete examples of how to achieve the Global Goals. The aim of the report is to stimulate dialogue with other countries and actors and help inspire concrete ideas: “This is very much an educational product to raise awareness of the importance of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda and its link to the 2030 Agenda,” says Måns Fellesson, Deputy Director at the MFA Global Agenda Department.

17 May is the international day against homophobia, transphobia and biphobia (IDAHOT) – an important day aimed at highlighting the hate, violence and discrimination that still persist against LGBTI persons around the world.

To mark Europe Day on 9 May, Minister for EU Affairs Ann Linde took part in two panel discussions organised by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions. The themes were ‘Where would Europe be without the EU?’ and ‘The future of European cooperation – what will it look like?’ 

World Press Freedom Day on 3 May is the global celebration of the fundamental right to freedom of expression. The struggle for press freedom is more important than ever.

At Sweden’s initiative, Johan Bävman’s photo exhibition Swedish Dads was on display at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris for several weeks in March and April. The exhibition shows 25 fathers on parental leave, and offers a snapshot of Swedish dads’ views on parental leave and gender equality. Some 10 000–15 000 people saw the exhibition at the OECD.

Today, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MFA) is presenting new country reports on human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The launch is part of the Government’s work to promote, prevent and influence developments in these areas.

Wikipedia is the world’s most used online encyclopaedia. Among the millions of articles there are four times as many articles about men as there are about women. Behind the scenes the figures are even worse: only nine per cent of editors are women and one per cent are transgender people; the rest are men. Moreover, the majority of those who edit articles are well-educated people from countries in the west.
But this can be changed. Sweden’s Embassy in New Delhi decided to help out.

Representatives of some 50 nations gathered in Brussels at the beginning of March to build a global financial and political partnership for the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of women and girls. The She Decides conference reverberated across the world and was able to raise a total of EUR 181 million to support organisations working on SRHR.

“Freedom of expression is our greatest step forward,” said Sayeda Mojgan Mustafavi, Deputy Minister of Information and Culture in Afghanistan, in her address as the Embassy in Kabul hosted a conference for the third year in a row on journalist safety, transparency and freedom of expression.