Speaking to a number of foreign dignitaries in Stockholm yesterday, Minister for Foreign Affairs Margot Wallström expressed her gratitude for electing Sweden to take a non-permanent seat in the United Nations Security Council.

For Sweden, the fight for human rights – both at home and internationally – is a key issue that must permeate all policy areas.
Human Rights Day is celebrated around the world on 10 December every year.
Rarely has the day been as important to celebrate as now.

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act. It was the first legislation of its kind anywhere in the world.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and are still worth fighting for today!

The ambition was to conclude the EGA this weekend. We failed. A lot of finger pointing is taking place right now, as usual after negotiations stall, but trying to assign blame is not really meaningful. In trade negotiations defensive interests are usually the most difficult obstacles to get past. Even in an agreement like the EGA where the gains for all are so obvious, we could not avoid getting stuck on a few defensive positions.

This summer, former Director-General of the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, was appointed new Chair of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). This autumn she took up her new full-time position at the Secretariat in Paris.

The statue of Swedish newspaper publisher Lars Johan Hierta watches over Riddarhustorget in Stockholm’s Old Town. And what a proud inscription: “Lars Johan Hierta, pioneer of a free press and popular government.”

It’s 250 years since Sweden established the world’s strongest freedom of the press through a ground-breaking new fundamental law, the Freedom of the Press Act.
Freedom of the press, freedom of expression and opposition to censorship are of course well worth celebrating – and continuing to fight for today!

This year Sweden celebrates 70 years in the UN. And for as many years, Sweden has supported peacebuilding efforts, through its national membership but also through all of the Swedes who work under the UN flag out in the field. Malin Herwig is one of these people.

One year after the historic climate agreement at COP21 in Paris, it’s time again. On this occasion, the countries of the world are meeting in Marrakech for the major climate change conference COP22. The main objective is to establish a regulatory framework to enable countries to reach the goals agreed in Paris.